“But the past cannot be changed, and we carry our choices with us, forward, into the unknown. We can only move on.”
— Libba Bray, The Sweet Far Thing (via observando)
“Pride is a funny thing; it can make what is truly worthless appear to be a treasure.”
— Alice Hoffman, Practical Magic (via observando)
“The single greatest lesson the garden teaches is that our relationship to the planet need not be zero-sum, and that as long as the sun still shines and people still can plan and plant, think and do, we can, if we bother to try, find ways to provide for ourselves without diminishing the world.”
— Michael Pollan (via observando)
“Life is difficult for everyone. We all have stress and we all need someone in our lives that we can lean on. Never think that you cannot talk to someone because they have problems to or that your friend or loved one would be better off without you or your problems. You’ll soon find out that they need you just as much as you need them.”
— Joshua Hartzell (via observando)

anthonymackies:

New Avengers: Age of Ultron pictures from Entertainment Weekly.

“You say I started out with practically nothing, but that isn’t correct. We all start with all there is, it’s how we use it that makes things possible.”
— Henry Ford (via observando)

Brilliant Ways to Hack Your Ikea Furniture

“A good library will never be too neat, or too dusty, because somebody will always be in it, taking books off the shelves and staying up late reading them.”
— Lemony Snicket, Horseradish (via observando)
“Students who considered themselves socialists were not so much interested in the poor as they were desirous of leading the poor, of being their guides and saviors. It was just this paternalism toward the poor that the vision of solidarity I had learned in religious settings was meant to challenge. From a spiritual perspective, the poor were there to guide and lead the rest of us by example if not by outright action and testimony. As a student I read Marx, Gramsci, and a host of other male thinkers on the subject of class. These works provided theoretical paradigms but rarely offered tools for confronting the complexity of class in daily life.

[…]

[W]hen I told friends and colleagues that I was resigning from my academic job to focus on writing, I was warned that I was making a dangerous mistake, that I could not possibly live on an income that was between twenty and thirty thousand dollars a year. When I pointed to the reality that families of four and more live on such an income, the response would be “that’s different”; the difference being, of course, one of class. The poor are expected to live with less and are socialized to accept less (badly made clothing, products, food, etc.), whereas the well-off are socialized to believe it is both a right and a necessity for us to have more, to have exactly what we want when we want it.”
— bell hooks, where we stand: Class Matters, chapter 4 (via snailfan)

(Source: facelessbitchmage)